American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) – Myths About Never Ending Pursuit of Patient Safety and Satisfaction Debunked

PK anesthesia denied Level I validation for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV)

The first of the new of brain activity monitors was FDA approved in 1996. Prior to this monitor, anesthesiologists were forced to give more anesthesia than necessary for fear of giving too little. With this monitor, anesthesiologists can avoid this practice and give only that amount which is necessary.

Action: Missed the ‘forest’ for the ‘trees.’

Propofol ketamine (PK) anesthesia was developed in 1992 by Friedberg. PK was enhanced by the addition of a brain activity monitor in 1997. In 1999, the lowest PONV rate of 0.5% was published in a high-risk group of patients without the use of any anti-vomiting drugs. With 43,000 members, the ASA web site has no patient testimonial page.

In 2004, a Level I study was designed by one of the foremost internationally recognized names in postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). When presented with the means (and funding) to validate PK anesthesia as a way to provide the ‘never ending pursuit of patient …satisfaction’ by eliminating PONV, seven different universities (all ASA affiliates) declined the opportunity.

Let the public decide.

Do actions speak louder than words?

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