Commercial rat control services strive to get rid of infestations in the Seattle area

The Department of Agriculture examined the data on the resilient rat infestations and found it could be due to the construction boom that’s got rodents on the move.

As if traffic congestion and skyrocketing housing costs weren’t enough forSeattleites to complain about, here’s another problem to blame on Seattle’srecent growth spurt: RatsCould be an unintended consequence of the Seattle building constructionboom.

Construction is definitely playing a role in it. Many clients in olderhomes near a property that is being redeveloped suddenly see the pests.When the home or building is knocked down it eliminates the habitat, butnot the rats. Now the rats are on the move. So by living next door ownerscould wind up with some new, unwelcome housemates.

While new construction may be increasing the number of sightings, rats havelong thrived in Seattle. Conditions here are perfect for rats as it doesn’tget that cold. So the rats go unchecked through winter. Also due to theabundance of lakes and streams and plenty of fresh water.

Do not use rat poison. For one, it’s truly awful stuff that slays rodents in a most unpleasant fashion the most popular formulas use anticoagulants, which make rodents slowly bleed to death internally. The rats have a tendency to crawl somewhere inaccessible before expiring, then stink up homes in a kind of posthumous revenge. Rat poison is also highly toxic to more than rats, it’s dangerous for curious kiddos and pets, too.

This problem has gotten so bad that the EPA recently ordered a phase-out of the worst kinds of anticoagulants, though it’s still on some store shelves right now. Other types of rat poisons also pose a risk to wildlife, though, so steer clear.

Unlike in basketball, the best offense is a good defense when it comes to pest control. Once evicting the unwelcome guests, make sure a come back is impossible by sealing up all gaps, holes, or vents in the home with caulk or steel wool. Trim back tree branches that come within about six feet of roofs.

Finally, it would be remiss not to mention the most natural of rat control strategies: predators. A cat (or a rat terrier) might be just the thing to scare the rodents away. Or chew on this: A barn owl family can eat 3,000 rodents every year. Building abarn owl box can lure these rat assassins right to the yard – as long as the whole neighborhood promises not to use rat poison, that is. The food web: Sometimes it works against the situation, but hey, sometimes it works for the issue at hand.